Ultimate One-Ton HD Challenge: Davis Dam Acceleration

IMG_7691a II

The Davis Dam grade, about two hours southeast of Las Vegas, will be familiar to many of our readers, not only because we've conducted several past comparison tests there, but because it is one of the major routes used in the Society of Automotive Engineers' requirements for conforming to the new J2807 towing standards. From our point of view, if the grade is good enough for the SAE, it's good enough for PickupTrucks.com.

 

HD_1T_DavisClimbFINAL3[1]

The bottom-to-top runs were fairly uneventful but did show off each of the contenders' strengths and weaknesses. The Ford F-350 continued to do a great job at takeoff, pulling strong right off the line. In fact, the F-350 had the best time, finishing the climb in just more than 11.5 minutes; it also had the highest top speed at 64.1 mph. The GMC Sierra 3500 finished second at just less than 12.5 minutes with a 60.5 top speed. And the Ram 3500 finished in third place, not far behind the GMC, in just less than 13 minutes with a top speed of 59.9 mph.

The cooling fans came on in all three pickups during the runs, but the Ram's was by far the loudest; none of the trucks' cooling temperatures rose into critical areas during testing.

How We Did the Testing

Sometimes at Davis Dam we've had to conduct our runs at night because of congestion; however, on this occasion we were able to start our runs late in the afternoon due to much-lighter-than-usual traffic. Road temperatures during our test were just more than 100 degrees, with little to no wind observed. As you might expect, there was no humidity.

We took our measurements over the course of a 10.8-mile section of state Route 68 that starts at the bottom of the hill just after the last stoplight in Bullhead City, Ariz., and finishes just as you hit the Union Pass summit. The grade climbs just more than 3,000 feet in elevation and has a consistent 5 percent grade with occasional 7 and 8 percent sections throughout, and six gentle curves.

As in previous tests, we had two testers in each test truck, one driver and one data collector. It's important to note that these Week 2 tests (Davis Dam and Eisenhower Pass) were conducted with the same pickup trucks that we had for Week 1 (drag strip, hill climb and brake testing in Michigan), but the trailers were very different.

For our Las Vegas to Denver run, we worked with our friends at Load Trail, who set us up with three identical Load Max double-axle dovetail Low Pro gooseneck trailers, rated to carry up to 30,000 pounds. We did not need that full capacity as we used the trailers to carry our three-quarter-ton competitors and several water tanks. Each trailer weighed more than 20,000 pounds and provided a substantial load for testing. In all three cases, they were within 2,300 pounds of gross combined weight ratings.

Cars.com photos by Evan Sears

 

IMG_7679a II

IMG_7711a II



 

Overview | Milan Dragway | Fuel Economy | Milford Hill Climb | Milford Braking | Davis Dam | Davis Braking | Eisenhower Pass | Eisenhower Braking | Results

Comments

Each truck would have crossed the border in to California exceeding their 55 mph speed limit for towing a trailer.

So none of the trucks carried the same weight as it says in the article that each truck were within 2,300 pounds of gross combined weight ratings.

Why not post what the weights were?

Who towed the most weight? Was it the Ram again like the last test?

It easy to add gm more hp and torque same like ford and made another test for fun,,,,:)

@Ramadan Little Horn -

"Since most of our driving and many of our tests were done on public roads, we thought we'd try to keep the total weight of each truck and trailer at just less than 24,000 pounds, the legal limit in many states for noncommercial towing. In the end, the one-ton pickups weighed within 300 pounds of each other and each truck and trailer combination weighed within 200 pounds of each other."

@ Big Horn

They did post the weights of the trailers in the overview section

"As in previous tests, we had two testers in each test truck, one driver and one data collector. It's important to note that these Week 2 tests (Davis Dam and Eisenhower Pass)"

http://special-reports.pickuptrucks.com/2014/08/2014-ultimate-hd-challenge-one-ton-overview.html

Ford: 20,900 lb trailer
GCWR: 31,900 lbs

GM: 20,600 lb trailer
GCWR: 30,500 lbs

Ram: 21,140 lb trailer
GCWR: 32,000 lbs


The Ram had the heaviest trailer by 240lbs over the Ford which would not have made much of a difference on the times. Maybe a tenth of a second or two on the multi mile runs. Even if you took off 10 seconds to the Ram's time as a handicap for the 240 extra pounds it still would not make a difference in either the Davis Dam(test that mirrored the J2807) or the Eisenhower pass.


Again who starts off at a dead stop when they come to a hill?

No one this is another worthless test. I don't care if the Ram would have won them all it is stupid worthless test that does not happen in real life. In real life all of these trucks would have gone up that hill from the bottom already doing the speed limit.

Pickup Truck dot Com has become nothing but a joke. Worthless tests that are not even remotely close to how these trucks are used in real life.

Waste of internet bandwidth to even post them.

Thanks Mark, great test! Ignore the haters.

@Big Horn

"Again who starts off at a dead stop when they come to a hill?"

Apparently people that have to obey the law and stop at stoplights.

Davis Damn

"We took our measurements over the course of a 10.8-mile section of state Route 68 that starts at the bottom of the hill just after the last STOPLIGHT in Bullhead City, Ariz., and finishes just as you hit the Union Pass summit. The grade climbs just more than 3,000 feet in elevation and has a consistent 5 percent grade with occasional 7 and 8 percent sections throughout, and six gentle curves"

Street view of the stoplight at the start of the Davis Dam test.
https://www.google.com/maps/@35.182934,-114.563446,3a,75y,18.52h,71.59t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sqE8MCxdpfXU6FrhfDqcNhA!2e0


Or people just getting on an on-ramp coming off a stoplight.

The Eisenhowet Pass

"Each of our multiple runs was done at night for the sake of traffic and safety, and began at the entrance of the freeway on-ramp in Dillon, Colo."

Here is a street view of the on ramp they used to get on I-70 that comes directly off a stoplight.

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.628618,-106.065893,3a,75y,42.98h,82.18t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sJvXlC5KaWQAmE7CZLCKBVg!2e0

@Ramadan Little Horn - stop crying.

How about a sae test of all trucks and find out what their max tow really is since the manufacturers keep putting off adhering to the standard

All trailers should be the same weight, without that the whole test is almost worthless. The trucks curb weight and gvwr has nothing to do with how it should be loaded for the test (within its limits of course) otherwise you might as well test a loaded truck against an unloaded one. Although I will say this is the best comparison of new trucks out there and at least they DID give the actual trailer and pin weight, and at least they all had the same axle ratio this time, maybe next year it will be with equal weight, same model year truck, same axle ratio etc ...



Post a Comment

Please remember a few rules before posting comments:

  • Try to be civil to your fellow blog readers.
  • Stay on topic. We want to hear your opinions and thoughts, but please only comment about the specified topic in the blog post.

If you have a TypeKey or TypePad account, please Sign In